Point of Care Testing

Routine blood glucose (sugar) measurement

Random blood sugar levels fluctuate depending on the length of time since the person last ate and the type of food eaten. They are used to help diagnose or treat diabetes.

Lipids – total Cholesterol HDL, LDL & Tryglycerides

Cholesterol is a waxy fat like substance made in the liver and found in all cells of the body. It is hugely important in many key physiological processes around the body.

HbA1c

This reflects the average plasma glucose (blood sugar) over the previous 8-12 weeks. HbA1c stands for Haemoglobin A1c or glycated haemoglobin.

Insulin

This test measures the amount of insulin in your blood. Insulin is a hormone that helps move glucose (blood sugar), from your bloodstream into your cells.

What happens during these tests?

A finger is pricked using a sterile lancet, and a small sample of blood taken either directly onto the test strip or into a pipette, depending on the amount of blood required.

Point of care testing is defined as a medical diagnostic test performed at or near the point of care. It is essentially a laboratory test conducted outside of the laboratory.

We can offer the following tests using finger pick, capillary blood.

Routine blood glucose (sugar) measurement

Random blood sugar levels fluctuate depending on the length of time since the person last ate and the type of food eaten. They are used to help diagnose or treat diabetes.

HbA1c

This reflects the average plasma glucose (blood sugar) over the previous 8-12 weeks.

HbA1c stands for Haemoglobin A1c or glycated haemoglobin and is made when glucose (sugar) sticks to the haemoglobin found in red blood cells.

The longer glucose found in the blood the higher the HbA1c will be, as more glucose is available to stick to the haemoglobin. The higher the result the greater the risk of developing diabetes.

These red bloods cells are active for 8-12 weeks, so changes can take this long to be seen. A result up to 42mmol/mol (6%) is normal. Above 42mmol/mol (6%) but below 48mmol/mol (6.5%) is defined as pre-diabetes, any level above 48mmol/mol (6.5%) is defined as diabetes.

Lipids – total Cholesterol HDL, LDL & Tryglycerides

Cholesterol is a waxy fat like substance made in the liver and found in all cells of the body. It is hugely important in many key physiological processes around the body. The body tightly controls the production and absorption of Cholesterol, and 75% is made by the body itself. Total cholesterol is the sum of High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) so called ‘good’ cholesterol as it helps the body get rid of harmful or damaged cholesterol, by transporting it to the liver for breaking down. Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) sometimes called ‘bad cholesterol’ which carries the cholesterol around your body from the liver. Triglycerides are another type of fat found in blood. When you eat your body converts the calories it doesn’t need to use straight away into triglycerides which are stored in the fat cells for use between meals.

Insulin

This test measures the amount of insulin in your blood. Insulin is a hormone that helps move glucose (blood sugar), from your bloodstream into your cells. Glucose comes from the foods you eat and drink and is also made by the liver. It is one of your body’s main sources of energy.

Insulin plays a key role in keeping glucose at the right levels. If glucose levels are too high or too low, it can cause serious health problems. If insulin is too high, it can also cause significant health problems.

Insulin resistance is when cells in your body do not respond effectively to the hormone insulin that is circulating in your body. This causes the pancreas to secrete even more of this important hormone in an effort to keep your blood sugar stable.

Insulin has many roles. Its primary role is to keep our blood glucose levels in a very tight range called blood glucose homeostasis. That’s because both, too high and too low, blood glucose levels are dangerous and damaging to the body. When glucose levels rise, more insulin is secreted. When glucose levels fall, less insulin is secreted. Since higher levels of insulin have been associated with numerous chronic health conditions, it makes sense that keeping insulin in a lower physiologic range may be better for your long-term health.

What happens during these tests?

A finger is pricked using a sterile lancet, and a small sample of blood taken either directly onto the test strip or into a pipette, depending on the amount of blood required.

How long does it take?

Test results are available between 1 and 15 minutes later depending on which test is performed.

Are there any risks to the test?

There is very little risk, you may have slight pain or bruising at the spot where the needle was put in, but most symptoms go away quickly.

We Offer

HbA1c testing – £50 without discussion or £75 with discussion

Takes 15 to 30 minutes

Lipid testing – £75 without discussion or £150 with discussion

Takes 15 to 30 minutes

One-off fasting glucose and insulin test – £50 without discussion or £75 with discussion

Takes around 30 minutes

Fasting glucose and insulin test, plus a controlled glucose drink and repeat glucose & insulin test after 40 minutes – £125 without discussion or £175 with discussion

Takes 60-90 minutes

A full insulin assay (Kraft test) as above but repeat blood tests at intervals of 30 minutes £400 with discussion

Takes 3 to 4 hours